Doctors can object to procedures, not specific patients, under revised religious discrimination bill

Press/Media: Expert Comment

Subject

Religious Discrimination Bill

Period12 Dec 2019

Media contributions

1

Media contributions

  • TitleDoctors can object to procedures, not specific patients, under revised religious discrimination bill
    Degree of recognitionNational
    Media name/outletNews GP
    Media typeWeb
    CountryAustralia
    Date12/12/19
    DescriptionUnder the revisions, conscientious objectors could refuse to provide treatments to which they objected on religious grounds, as long as the refusal is a blanket ban.
    Associate Professor Mark Morgan, GP and Chair of the RACGP Expert Committee – Quality Care (REC–QC), has previously told newsGP that the best situation would be to refer to another GP in the same practice.

    He suggested that GPs who conscientiously object should be ‘non-judgemental, empathic and sensitive with good communication’ while declining the request.

    ‘You want this person on side and to remain on side so the therapeutic relationship can be maintained, whether or not you’re actively involved,’ he said. ‘[I]f you are uncomfortable directly being involved in care, you have a duty to direct the patient to a provider of services.’
    Producer/AuthorDoug Hendrie
    PersonsMark Morgan