Australia to become leader in understanding infectious disease

Press/Media: Expert Comment

Description

t is hoped a new institute for infectious disease will improve capacity to respond to pandemics, but experts say GPs must be involved....

Professor Mark Morgan, Chair of the RACGP Expert Committee – Quality Care (REC– QC), welcomed the news but also supported Dr Nespolon’s assessment, stating that the inclusion of GPs and primary care researchers will be essential.
 
‘This is exciting news because it brings together centres of research to create a hub of expertise,’ he told newsGP.
 
‘I very much hope that some of the excellent primary care GP researchers will be brought into the fold – they’d have a lot to add.  
‘GPs are central to the rapid identification of new constellations of symptoms, and of course, GPs have their own questions, which are not necessarily about the design of the new treatment but the non-pharmaceutical questions.
 
‘What really works in infection control? We’ve seen people working from very old pieces of research and a bunch of assumptions.’

Subject

Australian Institute for Infectious Diseases and Global Health

Role of primary care research

General practice

Period13 Nov 2020

Media contributions

1

Media contributions

  • TitleAustralia to become leader in understanding infectious disease
    CountryAustralia
    Date13/11/20
    DescriptionIt is hoped a new institute for infectious disease will improve capacity to respond to pandemics, but experts say GPs must be involved...

    Professor Mark Morgan, Chair of the RACGP Expert Committee – Quality Care (REC– QC), welcomed the news but also supported Dr Nespolon’s assessment, stating that the inclusion of GPs and primary care researchers will be essential.

    ‘This is exciting news because it brings together centres of research to create a hub of expertise,’ he told newsGP.

    ‘I very much hope that some of the excellent primary care GP researchers will be brought into the fold – they’d have a lot to add.
    ‘GPs are central to the rapid identification of new constellations of symptoms, and of course, GPs have their own questions, which are not necessarily about the design of the new treatment but the non-pharmaceutical questions.

    ‘What really works in infection control? We’ve seen people working from very old pieces of research and a bunch of assumptions.’
    PersonsMark Morgan